Food a Part of Many MSUS Functions.

In June, 2016, MSUS celebrated its 50th Anniversary. This article focuses on "Food." Food seems to be a part of many of our MSUS functions. Whether it is a dessert bar after a concert, treats provided by Hospitality teams or sharing a box of Girl Scout cookies during a committee meeting, food is present in the MSUS way of life.

Do you know our food history? Can you answer these questions about food at MSUS?

50th Anniversary Trivia!!

TRIVIA QUESTION: What was the first special food events held at MSUS?

BONUS QUESTION: When did Second Sunday potlucks begin?

ANOTHER BONUS QUESTION: What were Circle Suppers and Bouncing Brunches?

STILL ANOTHER BONUS QUESTION: What have youth done with food?

A FINAL BONUS QUESTION: What food events are notable?

Scroll down for the answers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50th Anniversary Trivia Answers

TRIVIA QUESTION: What was the first special food events held at MSUS?

The Women’s Club cooked an Easter breakfast in 1967 in the basement of the East River Road church before the Sunday service. The basement was so small and the crowd so large (90 people served!) that the meal was served in three shifts! Cost was 80 cents per person; 40 cents for children.

The first potluck was an Adult Only event held on a Wednesday evening in November of 1968. The Calling Committee, making phone calls, invited each adult in the congregation to attend and determined what dish would be brought. This assured a well balanced variety of dishes to be served at the meal.

Every year from 1966 to 2006, Sunday services were suspended for the summer. The church year ended with an annual picnic on Memorial Day Sunday. Locations varied: Fridley’s Locke Park and Manomin Park, Springbrook Nature Center, East Bethel Park, members’ homes and other places were visited.

BONUS QUESTION: When did Second Sunday potlucks begin?

After moving to our current location, the spacious Social Hall allowed for regular potlucks. Coupled with the monthly Social Action Committee food shelf collections, a Potluck took place after the services on the ‘Second Sunday’ of each month. For a couple years, we designated monthly alphabet themes so members would bring foods beginning with that designated letter. Games at each table allowed people to list as many foods as they could think of which began with that letter. In later years, the Scorched Fork … and the Scorched Spoon were given as awards to the dishes that were voted as the ‘best’ of the month.

ANOTHER BONUS QUESTION: What were Circle Suppers and Bouncing Brunches?

Both the suppers and brunches were arranged in member homes as ways for small groups to gather over meals. Sometimes they were used as ways to get better acquainted and build friendships. Other times important congregational discussions took place – deciding about ministry, creating a vision and mission statement, or expanding our building, etc.

STILL ANOTHER BONUS QUESTION: What have youth done with food?

Pancake breakfasts were planned, prepared, served and cleaned up after by youth groups at various times starting in the 1960’s through the 90’s. Currently, children serve at ‘SoUUper Sunday’ meals prepared by the RE families. Both activities were/are sponsored to raise money for youth activities, trips, registrations for conferences, etc.

A FINAL BONUS QUESTION: What food events are notable?

When chicken prices dropped to 25 cents a pound, church members were invited to a bring-the-fixins’ to a potluck where baked chicken was abundant. Strawberry Festivals were held during as outreach activities, once as the MSUS contribution to the Fridley 49er’ Days festival. Once, when Christmas was on a Sunday, Doyle Mullin and Barbara Hughes arranged dinner for the singles at the church. Barb roasted the turkeys and others helped make a cheerful holiday! The Men’s Club hosts Christmas holiday brunch and a Mother’s Day Picnic annually and the Mom’s Group returns the favor by hosting the Father’s Day social hour.